Tuesday, September 14, 2010

We're live!

It's been a busy July and August, but thanks to Barry, Brian, and the latest addition to our team, Ed, our website is off the ground and showcasing our JavaScript simulation of the full 6502 chip!  To get you settled into the landscape of the 6502, here's a low res shot of the chip die and a glimpse of our vector polygon model of the chip, annotated to show which pads connect to which pins of the 40-pin plastic chip package.

 

12 comments:

  1. Could you start a GitHub project for the JavaScript code? I'd like to fork from it and attempt to speed it up. I think it can be made far faster.

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  2. Hi, in firefox exist an error, the file "segdefs.js" is not ended, the array is not closed.

    any idea?

    adolfojunior

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  3. Are you planning to sell posters of those? With a few extra annotations the one on the right would be poster-worthy.

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  4. YOU GUYS REALLY REALLY ROCK! I just started playing w/ some JS+Canvas for just displaying chip images, hoping one day to achieve what you guys just did!

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  5. This are one of most beutiful pics I have seen!
    Congratulation for this initiative! Its a amazin way to touch our hearts!

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  6. Hi Mark -
    You're in luck:
    http://github.com/trebonian/visual6502

    All -
    Thanks for the good words! We're planning to make posters, mugs, and t-shirts, and the best images are yet to come. It's been a busy six days since we opened the site!
    - Greg

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  7. A friend suggests adding another layer along the lines of: http://img.zdnet.com/techDirectory/_386CHIP.GIF

    Kudos to all

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  8. I want this running on a big flat display hung to our science college departement! Is there a javascript interpreter and a browser ever made to run ON a 6502? 8-)

    It would be sloowww but mesmerizing to watch: a graphical quine, an image computing itself. a cellular automoton on steroid... 8-)

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  9. This is totally awesome.

    Any plans to wire up an assembler to the Javascript version of the simulator? A simple form to post assembly code to the server and have it load the resulting machine code into the starting memory array would be very cool.

    I know you guys are working on lots of other things relating to this, but I just thought i'd throw it out there as an idea.

    :)

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  10. I'm a very big fan of your work! In fact so much so, that I wanted to make a graphic out of it that I could hang on my wall. However, it turns out that on the website I don't find any file that tells me where the "vias and buried contacts" (slide 27 of your talk) are. Is this data available somewhere?

    Also, when I tried to find the piece of the 6502 that's the example on 17 of your talk, in the Javascript emulation it seems to be incomplete? I put a picture on http://www.cs.ru.nl/~freek/misc/foo.jpg, where the fragments on your slide are to the left and a fragment from the emulator is to the right, and there I seem to be missing two strips of metal in the green parts?

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  11. @Freek: certainly the vias and buried contacts data exists, but it hasn't been released.

    Also, all the power and ground net metal geometries are missing from the javascript data - makes it smaller, and easier to see what's happening, but does mean you don't see exactly what's on the presentation.

    @Joel: there is an interface to load hex - look to the 'expert' version of the simulator, which also points you to an online 6502 assembler at
    6502asm.com - and you can load program fragments using a long URL with (a)ddress and (d)ata elements, like this:
    http://visual6502.org/stage/JSSim/index.html?graphics=false&expert=true&steps=30&loglevel=3&a=0020&d=ea202143&a=4321&d=60&r=0020

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  12. Great article. I also read data room review and this article explains how to protect data.

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